Are You Sitting Comfortably?
This is a work by an artist called Denise Duong inspired by Fitzgerald’s short story “The Diamond As Big As the Ritz”. I read the story the other day and I couldn’t help but really like it - I know I haven’t exactly read widely within the genre(?) of the short story, but I can’t help but think that Fitzgerald must be among one of the best short story writers, like, ever. His way of writing perfectly suits this format in which there is a lot to say but very little space in which to say it, due to the fact that he is a master of imagery. He uses rich, synaesthetic descriptions to illustrate the world his characters inhabit - descriptions which live up to the wonder of the things to which they belong. For example, the extreme wonder of the Washingtons’ mountainside palace is a concept that could have overwhelmed some writers, but Fitzgerald navigates us through it with ease.
Though the story does begin as a mere indulgence of the writer’s craving for decadence, it moves deeper until it becomes an interesting study of riches and the value of material possessions. What would you do if you found a diamond so big that it was essentially useless? What would anyone do? Fitzgerald expertly guides his readers from a superficial appreciation of the luxury of the characters’ situation to a deeper reflection upon the more sinister aspects of wealth and the way it can corrupt human thoughts and actions.
It’s everything I hoped this story would be when I read about it beforehand - it’s fun without being shallow, and somewhat philosophical without being too intense or dreary. As you’ve probably guessed, I really freakin’ loved it.
You can read the whole thing here.

This is a work by an artist called Denise Duong inspired by Fitzgerald’s short story “The Diamond As Big As the Ritz. I read the story the other day and I couldn’t help but really like it - I know I haven’t exactly read widely within the genre(?) of the short story, but I can’t help but think that Fitzgerald must be among one of the best short story writers, like, ever. His way of writing perfectly suits this format in which there is a lot to say but very little space in which to say it, due to the fact that he is a master of imagery. He uses rich, synaesthetic descriptions to illustrate the world his characters inhabit - descriptions which live up to the wonder of the things to which they belong. For example, the extreme wonder of the Washingtons’ mountainside palace is a concept that could have overwhelmed some writers, but Fitzgerald navigates us through it with ease.

Though the story does begin as a mere indulgence of the writer’s craving for decadence, it moves deeper until it becomes an interesting study of riches and the value of material possessions. What would you do if you found a diamond so big that it was essentially useless? What would anyone do? Fitzgerald expertly guides his readers from a superficial appreciation of the luxury of the characters’ situation to a deeper reflection upon the more sinister aspects of wealth and the way it can corrupt human thoughts and actions.

It’s everything I hoped this story would be when I read about it beforehand - it’s fun without being shallow, and somewhat philosophical without being too intense or dreary. As you’ve probably guessed, I really freakin’ loved it.

You can read the whole thing here.

2 years ago | 2 notes
2 notes
tagged as: Miscellaneous. the diamond as big as the Ritz. F. Scott Fitzgerald. brilliant. short story. review.

  1. writtenontheflyleaves posted this


Source: deniseduongart.com

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